View Poll Results: How do your NTN boots measure up? (toe-2-duckbutt)

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  • S: 156.5 mm / 6.16" (6-5/32)

    3 33.33%
  • S: 157.5 mm / 6.2" (6-13/64)

    0 0%
  • S: 158.5 mm / 6.24" (6-1/4)

    2 22.22%
  • S: 159.5 mm / 6.28" (6-9/32")

    3 33.33%
  • L: 174.5 mm / 6.87" (6-7/8")

    0 0%
  • L: 175.5 mm / 6.91" (6-29/32")

    0 0%
  • L: 176.5 mm / 6.95" (6-61/64")

    4 44.44%
  • L: 177.5 mm / 7.0"

    1 11.11%
  • Brand: Crispi

    5 55.56%
  • Brand: Scarpa

    8 88.89%
  • Brand: Scott

    1 11.11%
  • Binding: Outlaw

    6 66.67%
  • Binding: Meidjo

    5 55.56%
  • Binding: Freeride

    0 0%
  • Binding: Freedom

    1 11.11%
  • Binding: Lynx

    2 22.22%
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Thread: Crispi NTN boots out of spec?

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    Revelstoke, BC
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    Crispi NTN boots out of spec?

    Hi fellow freeheelers. I just switched from a 75mm setup to one with a size small Meidjo 2.1. Being new to the NTN scene, Iím not sure what is normal so hopefully someone can help me out.

    When my heel is down on the ski, the Meidjo claw partially disengages from the duckbutt. As I lift my heel, the claw will fully engage and hold the boot solidly. Essentially the spring box contacts the flex plate and stops forward travel before the heel is flat. Is it normal for the claw to not be snug on the duckbutt when the heel is down?

    While skiing, the binding will intermittently make a click sound when I lift my heel and I have determined that it is the springbox/claw snapping tight onto the duckbutt as the heel lifts. Is this normal? I did have a day when I was getting a lot of releases due to the duckbutt lifting out of the claw. Any thoughts?

    Thanks for any ideas.

    Cheers.

    P.S. My boot is a Crispi Evo NTN size 25.5. And I have been meticulous about clearing out snow and ice every time I put the boot in the binding.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Grant's Avatar
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    Aug 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkinnyG View Post
    Hi fellow freeheelers. I just switched from a 75mm setup to one with a size small Meidjo 2.1. Being new to the NTN scene, Iím not sure what is normal so hopefully someone can help me out.

    When my heel is down on the ski, the Meidjo claw partially disengages from the duckbutt. As I lift my heel, the claw will fully engage and hold the boot solidly. Essentially the spring box contacts the flex plate and stops forward travel before the heel is flat. Is it normal for the claw to not be snug on the duckbutt when the heel is down?

    While skiing, the binding will intermittently make a click sound when I lift my heel and I have determined that it is the springbox/claw snapping tight onto the duckbutt as the heel lifts. Is this normal? I did have a day when I was getting a lot of releases due to the duckbutt lifting out of the claw. Any thoughts?

    Thanks for any ideas.

    Cheers.

    P.S. My boot is a Crispi Evo NTN size 25.5. And I have been meticulous about clearing out snow and ice every time I put the boot in the binding.
    Is this just as you first put on the binding or while you have been skiing a while?

    When I first step into the binding, I click in my toes and then step down to engage the spring box. I have to lift my heel up and then put it back down to make sure the red stop bar has fully retracted into the spring box and isn't still in the stop plate.

  3. #3
    I had this happen when I broke the top tab off the red stop bar (inside the claw). So there was nothing to make the lower part of the red stop bar retract into the springbox body. A Voile strap -- not an EYT one yet, Craig! -- got me down the hill. So if I had to guess, I'd suspect maybe the red stop bar isn't retracting all the way for some reason, and when you push your foot down, it catches on the plate on the ski and forces the spring box backwards.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Revelstoke, BC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grant View Post
    Is this just as you first put on the binding or while you have been skiing a while?

    When I first step into the binding, I click in my toes and then step down to engage the spring box. I have to lift my heel up and then put it back down to make sure the red stop bar has fully retracted into the spring box and isn't still in the stop plate.
    It is all the time. Form what I can tell, either the boot is out of spec or the binding is out of spec. Unless the spec is for a little (0.5-1mm) space when the heel is down. The red bar is fully retracted into the spring box so doesn’t seem to be a factor. The spring box is perfectly butted up to the flex plate.
    Last edited by SkinnyG; 22nd December 2018 at 04:47 PM.

  5. #5
    Are you arming the spring box by lifting it so the red stub axle clicks and stands the spring box up? Then you place your boot in so the low tech locks, then press your heel down until it clicks, then lift your heel up and it clicks again. After two clicks your are in. Did you adjust the spring tension that connects the duckbutt? Level 1 3-4 DIN level 2 is 5-6 DIN, and so on. The only time I couldnít click in was operator error, I failed to remove piled up snow preventing me from pressing heel down for that 2nd click. Cheers!

  6. #6
    Edit: After the first heel press and click you depress your heel a second time and when it clicks you are in.

  7. #7
    Remember cock the spring box by lifting up the SB, red bar on the tour plate. Snap toe into the snow crab, lower heel to engage spring box, then lift your heel up, click....go skiing.

    You don’t have to lower your heel to the ski multiple times, you just have to lower it enough to engage the spring box, then lift it up to hear the click of the red bar release from the tour plate.

    Get some self stick anti-ice UHMW tape and cover the top of the spring box and inside the spring box clamp. This will help with snow and ice release so it doesn’t build up in the clamp area as well as under the springbox. Peruse my Meidjo 2.0 folder here Meidjo to see the anti-ice mods I’ve done to the Meidjo.

    I don’t mean mean to be a bummer here as I love the way this binding skis but the spring box design is seriously flawed with all the little details that Pierre designed into the spring box especially in the outer areas of the DB clamp where the small lateral red wings are. The design created a bunch of stress risers in the one piece injection molded plastic spring box. I broke three of them in this outer clamp area before my anti-ice mods because of ice/ snow build up and the resulting shallow duckbutt engagement of the clamp. I’ve not broken any more since I’ve done these AI mods.
    Last edited by Allan Fici; 22nd December 2018 at 07:08 PM.
    Function in disaster, finish in style.

  8. #8
    this sounds like the experience i had with a donated pair of freerides. Large binding, small boot. are you sure it is a small meidjo?

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by jasonq View Post
    this sounds like the experience i had with a donated pair of freerides. Large binding, small boot. are you sure it is a small meidjo?
    If it is in fact a large Meidjo then the flexor plate is longer as is the tour plate mounted on the ski. But I don’t see how he could activate the springs at all with a large binding and a small boot. I have a 25.5-26 Evo NTN World Cup and it skis great with a small Meidjo.
    Function in disaster, finish in style.

  10. #10
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Meidjo V2.1 instructions for stepping in binding.

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